African anti-corruption agencies and the problem of independence

Originally published on GI-ACE Anti-corruption law enforcement in Africa is facing multiple challenges, ranging from a lack of resources to the difficulty of producing evidence that holds up in court. This blog post focuses on one aspect of anti-corruption law enforcement that has proven to be particularly challenging: the independence of most African anti-corruption agencies. Originally deemed…

How can top-down audits and social audits respond to the changing technology of service delivery in India?

Originally published on GI-ACE On 24 September 2019, the Centre for Policy Research (CPR), in association with the Global Integrity Anti-Corruption Evidence (GI-ACE) research programme, hosted a workshop on ‘Audit and Anti-Corruption Measures in India.’ The workshop brought together government officials, policy activists, and researchers to deliberate on finding possible complementarities between social audits and top-down audits, with a…

Where does pressure for public procurement transparency come from? Reflections from Uganda and Tanzania

Originally published on GI-ACE For years, the benefits of transparency as a policy tool to increase accountability and counter corruption have been lauded. In public procurement, this has given rise to a global movement promoting procurement data transparency, a.k.a. open contracting. Many governments have committed to making public procurement data more transparent and open for…

The challenges in researching enablers of the corrupt

Originally published on GI-ACE October 9 saw our GI-ACE project’s first workshop, with the aim of laying out the research done so far and seeking advice on future lines of enquiry from the project’s advisors and around 20 hand-picked experts. Coming from the worlds of journalism, civil society, politics, law enforcement, academia, and risk management, these experts…

Harnessing informality for anti-corruption practice: Shifting the unit of analysis from individuals to networks

Originally published on GI-ACE Why do some countries keep struggling with high levels of corruption in spite of adopting most, if not all, internationally recommended legal and institutional anti-corruption prescriptions? It is striking that some of the countries deemed the most corrupt also happen to boast some of the most extensive and comprehensive anti-corruption regimes…at…