Harnessing Informality (Pt. 2): What could a network intervention to tackle anti-corruption look like?

Originally Published on GI-ACE In the first “Harnessing Informality” blog,  I explained the background stemming from the findings of our previous research, which explained how we found that informal social networks can be part of the explanation for why corruption seems to be so resilient. In our current follow-on project, we are exploring how this knowledge about…

From whistleblowing to community monitoring on East African borders

Originally published on GI-ACE Corruption, both petty and grand in scale, is a well-known problem facing traders crossing East Africa’s borders. It shows up in survey after survey and, like corruption more generally in the region, deeply affects the poor and is often gendered. This is hardly surprising. The 2019 Global Corruption Monitor results show the majority of African citizens surveyed from…

African anti-corruption agencies and the problem of independence

Originally published on GI-ACE Anti-corruption law enforcement in Africa is facing multiple challenges, ranging from a lack of resources to the difficulty of producing evidence that holds up in court. This blog post focuses on one aspect of anti-corruption law enforcement that has proven to be particularly challenging: the independence of most African anti-corruption agencies. Originally deemed…

How can top-down audits and social audits respond to the changing technology of service delivery in India?

Originally published on GI-ACE On 24 September 2019, the Centre for Policy Research (CPR), in association with the Global Integrity Anti-Corruption Evidence (GI-ACE) research programme, hosted a workshop on ‘Audit and Anti-Corruption Measures in India.’ The workshop brought together government officials, policy activists, and researchers to deliberate on finding possible complementarities between social audits and top-down audits, with a…

Where does pressure for public procurement transparency come from? Reflections from Uganda and Tanzania

Originally published on GI-ACE For years, the benefits of transparency as a policy tool to increase accountability and counter corruption have been lauded. In public procurement, this has given rise to a global movement promoting procurement data transparency, a.k.a. open contracting. Many governments have committed to making public procurement data more transparent and open for…